Sunday's Schedule

  • 09:00am
  • 09:30am
  • 10:00am
  • 10:30am
  • 11:00am
  • 11:30am
  • 12:00pm
  • 12:30pm
  • 1:00pm
  • 1:30pm
  • 2:00pm
  • 2:30pm
  • 3:00pm
  • 3:30pm
  • 4:00pm
  • 4:30pm
  • 5:00pm
  • 5:30pm
  • 6:00pm
  • 6:30pm
  • 7:00pm
  • 7:30pm
  • 8:00pm
  • 8:30pm
  • 9:00pm
  • 9:30pm
  • 10:00pm
  • 10:30pm
  • 11:00pm
  • Cara Irish Pub's Main Stage
    • Mass

      Archbishop Bernard Hebda is the celebrant.

    • Brass Lassie

      BRASS LASSIE, a bold new band based in the Twin Cities of St. Paul/Minneapolis, combines traditional tunes, songs and style with dazzling modern horn lines, sparking their own genre of eclectic, remarkable music. 10-member strong, the ensemble performs extraordinary takes on Scottish, Irish and French music, traditional and new, featuring a powerful 4-piece horn section, a terrific rhythm section, fine fiddles, flutes, pipes, vocals and some fabulous step dancing. Smart, joyous horn arrangements by top notch jazz arranger Peter Enblom, plus some great band arrangements from David Milne.  See more...

    • Doolin'

      Born in 2005, Doolin 'takes its name from a small village on the west coast of Ireland, renowned for its traditional music and high-rise craic, this typically Irish holiday spirit.

      After only a few months of existence, Doolin 'is already rubbing shoulders with the biggest and shares the stage with Alan Stivell in the framework of the festival of skin of Carmaux

    • The Screaming Orphans

      The Screaming Orphans are four sisters with the good fortune to have been raised in the magic of Bundoran in County Donegal, Ireland.

      There is a great tradition of music to be found in Irish homes especially in the Gaeltacht or Irish-speaking areas which have produced the likes of Clannad, Enya and Mairead, Micheal and Triona Ni Dhomhnaill. Our home was no exception. From we were young, we've been singing and playing traditional Irish music but when we hit our teenage years we knew it was time to start our own pop rock band.

    • We Banjo 3

      WE BANJO 3, AN IRISH QUARTET TRANSCENDING EVEN THE BEST SUPERLATIVES”

      THE HUFFINGTON POST

      For all the innovation and invention that goes into modern music these days, it’s the inspiration derived from one’s roots that proves the most enduring. So credit Galway, Ireland’s We Banjo 3 for finding common ground between old world tradition and authentic Americana by playing their banjo, fiddle, guitar and mandolin in an innovation fusion of styles that they dub “Celtgrass.”

      Four albums in — their latest, String Theory, was released in July of 2016 — the band’s rousing revelry, sheer virtuosity, power, passion and purpose have made them one of the music world’s most celebrated ensembles. Variously described as “astonishing,” “the Gold Standard of Irish and American Roots music,” and “the Irish Punch Brothers,” they’ve can claim the # 1 position in Billboard’s World Music charts, top honours from IMRO (the Irish Music Rights Organization), top sales numbers and the distinction of entertaining an American president, an Irish Prime Minister and members of the U.S. Congress at the annual “Friends of Ireland” luncheon on Capitol Hill. Little wonder then that We Banjo 3 is literally taking both sides of the Atlantic by storm, carving a reputation as one of the world’s most imaginative ensembles.

    • Altan

      No Irish traditional band in the last dozen years has had a wider impact on audiences and music lovers throughout the world than Altan.

      With their exquisitely produced award-winning recordings, ranging dynamically from the most sensitive and touching old Irish songs all the way to hard hitting reels and jigs, and with their heartwarming, dynamic live performances, Altan have moved audiences from Donegal to Tokyo to Seattle. Throughout, there has been the unwavering commitment of the band to bringing the beauty of traditional music, particularly that of the Donegal fiddlers and singers, to contemporary audiences in a way that brings out all its qualities and destroys none. In fact, Altan have always believed that Irish traditional music is a modern music in every sense and its growing influence and popularity have proved them right.

    • Scattering
  • Celtic Kitchen
  • Croke Park
  • Crossroads Social Dance & Session
  • Dance Stage
    • Saint Paul Irish Dancers

      Founder of St. Paul Irish Dancers, Eileen Dahill, parlayed a 1993 Minnesota Folk Arts grant into establishing St. Paul Irish Dancers. St. Paul Irish Dancers is a hearty Irish Stew of step dancing, figure work, and choreography that has evolved to becoming a Minnesota gateway to Irish culture through dance. In celebrating their 20th year of Irish dance they are proudest of expanding performances regionally in the 5 state area. They are known for their collaborative percussive work with tap and flamingo artists and travel regionally with the Ring of Kerry Band. Some "pit stops" this year have included the Paramount Theater in St. Cloud, the Get Lucky half marathon, St. Paul Irish Dancer's annual show, the Rhythm in the River in Jackson, Minnesota and now at Irish Fair of Minnesota.

    • Green Fire Irish Dancers

      For 15 years Green Fire Irish Dancers has performed contemporary hard and soft shoe steps and choreographies as well as traditional and historic dances from the early 1800's - early 1900's done in authentic period costume.  We also teach easy dances for audience participation.  Children, teens and adults practice and perform together.  Based in friendship and cooperation rather than competition, Green Fire strives to give all dancers the opportunity to pursue their dreams. Please contact Green Fire at greenfiredancers@gmail.com

    • Mooncoin Ceili Dancers

      The excitement of Irish dance is mainly in the legs and feet, with quick, graceful movements or vigorous battering steps carrying dancers though the complex, often geometrically patterned dances. Irish ceili and set dance are forms of dance that have traditionally been practiced socially. These are the dances that have brought people together for celebrations of all kinds throughout Irish history. Mooncoin Ceili Dancers honor these traditional dances, while infusing them with a modern performance spirit. We also create new dances in the ceili and set styles, demonstrating that all traditions are living, growing, constantly evolving entities that bring many and varied meanings into the lives of those who share them.

    • Shamrock Irish Dance

      The Shamrock School of Irish Step Dance is one of the longest running schools in the Twin Cities and is a performance and competitive school with many accomplished dancers at all levels. Our school is steeped in Irish culture and tradition as our founder- May Kirmer Buckley was born in Dublin, Ireland and a prominent dancer at the Theater Royle in Dublin’s fair city that moved to the US in 1945 after marry a “a prominent American soldier and a good looking Yankee in a uniform!” A love of Irish Dance and of continuing to foster the perfection and a passion for this sport/art form is what our school is all about. We offer classes from 4 through college ages and are based in Eagan, MN. We love participating in the Irish Fair of Minnesota and welcome new students.

    • Saint Paul Irish Dancers

      Founder of St. Paul Irish Dancers, Eileen Dahill, parlayed a 1993 Minnesota Folk Arts grant into establishing St. Paul Irish Dancers. St. Paul Irish Dancers is a hearty Irish Stew of step dancing, figure work, and choreography that has evolved to becoming a Minnesota gateway to Irish culture through dance. In celebrating their 20th year of Irish dance they are proudest of expanding performances regionally in the 5 state area. They are known for their collaborative percussive work with tap and flamingo artists and travel regionally with the Ring of Kerry Band. Some "pit stops" this year have included the Paramount Theater in St. Cloud, the Get Lucky half marathon, St. Paul Irish Dancer's annual show, the Rhythm in the River in Jackson, Minnesota and now at Irish Fair of Minnesota.

    • Rince na Chroi Irish Dancers

      The Rince na Chroi Irish Dancers are a performance-based Irish dance school from St. Paul. Founded in 2003 by owner and director Katie Stephens Spangler, Rince na Chroi averages over 100 public performances throughout the year- and the Irish Fair of Minnesota is always a highlight! Rince na Chroi has over 200 dancers of all ages, and they accept students as young as three, up through adults. Their dancers perform year-round at venues and events all over the Twin Cities and the Midwest. Visit their website or find Rince na Chroi on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube for more information.

    • Eilís Academy at Escalate

      Eilís (Ay-lish) Academy was founded in 2012 at Escalate Dance studio in Maple Grove. We are now located in Osseo and have grown to 50 dancers age 5 on up with dancers of all levels and abilities Directed by Liz Hines, a part of the Twin Cities Irish dance community for over 20 years is credentialed through An Coimisiun in Dublin Ireland. Eilis Academy hopes to inspire joy of dance in their dancers while instilling the discipline and determination required to succeed in the sport! 

    • O’Shea Irish Dance

      O'Shea Irish Dance is led by director Cormac O'Sé T.C.R.G. (certified instructor with An Coimisiún Le Rinci Gaelacha), original cast member of Riverdance & native of Dublin, Ireland. Cormac comes from a deep pedigree with the legendary Scoil Rince Uí Shé of Dublin, Ireland, taught by his parents for the last 47 years. Cormac toured for six years with Riverdance, performing over 2000 performances, across four continents to over two million people. He can be seen in the original film, Riverdance, The Show and four other film productions.  Established in 2005, OID provides training for the demanding and technical art form of traditional and competitive Irish Step dance where dancers train as artists, musicians, and athletes. Teaching ages three to adult, OID instructors inform the whole dancer to train a healthy body in strength, flexibility, and fitness as well as a healthy mind in confidence, discipline, and performance.   OID's Minnesota dancers have achieved 9 Regional Solo Championship titles, 2 Regional Ceili Titles, 2 National Championship Titles and 6 top-ten placements in the World Championships bringing the only 2 world globes home to the state.  O’Shea Irish Dance features their dancers in performances throughout the year, and produces two professional, full-length theatrical shows annually at several Twin Cities venues, including Stepping Stone Theater, Chanhassen Dinner Theater, and the Fitzgerald Theater.

    • North Star Irish Dancers

      North Star Irish Dance is a program offering Irish dance in a competition-free environment. Dancing in Eden Prairie and Northfield, NSID's strength is embracing dancers of various levels and customizing teaching styles to individual needs. NSID also frequently volunteers in the community as a part of their mission of Connecting to Community while Fostering Tradition.

    • Shamrock Irish Dance

      The Shamrock School of Irish Step Dance is one of the longest running schools in the Twin Cities and is a performance and competitive school with many accomplished dancers at all levels. Our school is steeped in Irish culture and tradition as our founder- May Kirmer Buckley was born in Dublin, Ireland and a prominent dancer at the Theater Royle in Dublin’s fair city that moved to the US in 1945 after marry a “a prominent American soldier and a good looking Yankee in a uniform!” A love of Irish Dance and of continuing to foster the perfection and a passion for this sport/art form is what our school is all about. We offer classes from 4 through college ages and are based in Eagan, MN. We love participating in the Irish Fair of Minnesota and welcome new students.

  • Pub stage
  • River Stage
    • The Eddies

      The Eddies are on a mission to bring harmony, smiles and musical entertainment to anyone willing to spend some time with us. We perform a mix of traditional, roots, soulful and whimsical songs sung with four voices, in our patented three and a half part harmonies. We sing unaccompanied on many songs but bring a guitar and an accordion to bear when the song wants it. If you come to hear us sing you will hear songs of work, love and death. See more about the Eddies

    • HiBs
    • Upset and Curl
    • Patsy O'Brien
    • The Langers Ball

      The Langer’s Ball, the two-piece Irish Folk-punk band, has been writing, touring and performing for over a decade. Playing their own brand of traditional drinking songs and original material, their sound is harder-hitting and bigger than you’d expect it ever could be. With a thumping beat and a flurry of notes and harmonies, you’ll dash to refill your drink and cheer for more.

  • Eóin McKiernan Speaker's Tent
    • Audrey Leonard 'Do you know this little known folklore?'

      Audrey has been researching her Irish family history for over 30 years, along with her German family history.  Currently the President and researcher for the Irish Genealogical Society Intl.

    • Eddie Owens 'New writing: Tales and Poetry.'

      Eddie Owens is a native of Dublin. Based in St. Paul for several decades, he is a sculptor who uses found objects to shape a narrative commentary on contemporary society, an actor who has created original monologues and characters relating to Irish historical topics as varied as the Easter Rising 1916 and the Famine of 1845-1851, and a poet reflecting on memories of Ireland and the passing of time. His sculpture and poetry were highlighted in the April 2018 St. Paul Irish Arts Week. 

    • Phoenix Theatre 'Dream Voices from the Irish Famine.'

      The Phoenix Theatre is a new Irish drama company based in the Eoin McKiernan Library (whose symbol is a phoenix) in the Celtic Junction Arts Center. It explores issues in Irish history, memory, and culture using a "devised" theatre approach in which the actors co-create the scripts and production in cooperation with the director, assistant director, and/or producer.

    • Patrick O'Donnell 'The Irish in Paris.'

      Patrick O'Donnell wears many hats at the Irish Fair. Currently, he is the founder/director of the St. Paul Irish Arts Week (since 2016), and coordinates the Cultural Area for the Fair. He also is very passionate about Ireland's literary history and enjoys giving talks on its authors. This year he is focusing on the extensive Irish connection to Paris. He also is the Director of Education at the Celtic Junction Arts Center and edits and writes for its online cultural magazine, The Celtic Junction Arts Review (www.celticjunction.org/arts-review). 

    • Jim Rogers 'The Strange Case of Angela's Ashes.'

      Jim Rogers  is director of the Center for Irish Studies at the University of St Thomas and the editor of New Hibernia Review, a leading journal that publishes articles from all disciplines. Jim is the author or editor of three books on Irish America, and has published articles in journals in the United States, Canada, France, and Ireland. He is a past president of the American Conference for Irish Studies

    • Carrie Finnigan 'Drawing Celtic Mythology.'

      Carrie Finnigan uses a playful approach in painting, printmaking and drawing of abstracted representations of human figures and nature. Growing up in close proximity to forests and water, she developed an affinity with the outdoors and was fascinated by the human - natural environment conflict. This youthful interest was formally developed in a B.A. in Fine Art. She delved into artistic practice, honing her preference for using color and line to express emotion. 

  • Triscéil Tea Room
    • The Center for Irish Music Ensemble

      Center for Irish Music Ensembles 

      Students from the Center for Irish Music performing on a variety of traditional instruments. Ensembles from the Center for Irish Music will perform in the Trisceil Tea Room at 5:00 pm on Friday, at 2:00 pm on Saturday, at 2:00 pm on Sunday and in the secondary Tea Room in the Hospitality Area near the Main Stage on Sunday following mass.  Learn More: https://www.centerforirishmusic.org/

    • Tom Klein

      Tom Klein performs on the uilleann pipes...Ireland’s very-own bagpipe!  But you won’t see him marching around the Fair:  The uilleann pipes are an indoor (and sitting down) kind of instrument.  Come see Tom - and hear the heart-and-soul of Ireland - Friday at 5:30 pm at the Crossroads Cultural Dance & Session Tent and Sunday at the Triscéil Tea Room at 11:00 am. Learn More.

    • The Giggin' Siles

      Giggin’ Síles - Maureen Engelhardt, Connie Hessevick, Mary Lane, Kathie Luby

      Traditional and not so traditional tunes sung in English and Gaelic. Learn More.

    • Hannah Flowers

      Hannah Flowers is a singer and Irish harpist from St. Paul, Minnesota.  Known for her sensitive and lyrical accompaniment of songs as well as her syncopated and rhythmic accompaniment of dance tunes, Hannah enjoys exploring the full depth of traditional Irish music and song.  Her passion is accompanying herself on the harp while singing songs, especially songs in the Irish language.  Apart from being an active performer on lever harp and as a singer, Hannah is a sought after harp and song teacher privately and at the Center for Irish Music, a non-profit community music school dedicated to handing down the tradition.

      Look for Hannah performing in the Triscéil Tea Room at 1:00 pm on Sunday and she is also presenting a workshop on singing in the Irish language with harp on Sunday at 11:00 am in the IMDA Workshop Tent.   www.facebook.com/harpisthannah/ 

    • The Center for Irish Music Ensemble

      Center for Irish Music Ensembles 

      Students from the Center for Irish Music performing on a variety of traditional instruments. Ensembles from the Center for Irish Music will perform in the Trisceil Tea Room at 5:00 pm on Friday, at 2:00 pm on Saturday, at 2:00 pm on Sunday and in the secondary Tea Room in the Hospitality Area near the Main Stage on Sunday following mass. Learn More: www.centerforirishmusic.org

    • Bundle and Go

      Bundle & Go - David and Suzanne Rhees

      Offering an eclectic mix of traditional tunes and songs from Ireland and Wales to Cape Breton and beyond, including original tunes and songs, on flute, fiddle, accordions, and more.  Bundle and Go will perform in the Trisceil Tea Room at 3:00 pm on Sunday and will present a workshop on the Quebec Connection on Sunday at noon in the IMDA Workshop Tent.

  • IMDA Workshop Tent
    • Hannah Flowers-Singing in the Irish Language with Harp

      Hannah Flowers is a singer and Irish harpist from St. Paul, Minnesota.  Known for her sensitive and lyrical accompaniment of songs as well as her syncopated and rhythmic accompaniment of dance tunes, Hannah enjoys exploring the full depth of traditional Irish music and song.  Her passion is accompanying herself on the harp while singing songs, especially songs in the Irish language.  Apart from being an active performer on lever harp and as a singer, Hannah is a sought after harp and song teacher privately and at the Center for Irish Music, a non-profit community music school dedicated to handing down the tradition.

    • Dave and Suzanne Rhees-The Quebec Connection

      Dave and Suzanne Rhees

      Offering an eclectic mix of traditional tunes and songs from Ireland and Wales to Cape Breton and beyond, including original tunes and songs, on flute, fiddle, accordions, and more. 

    • Charlie Heymann - Songs of Parting

      Charlie Heymann picked up his love of singing and Irish music from his mother and family friends such as the Armstrong family in Chicago. For 50+ years now Charlie has collected songs the world over, and many of his favorites are little known even to those with deep interests in the Irish, Scottish and American ballad traditions.

      YouTube link to Charlie’s singing

      Parting Songs Workshop (Sunday Aug 12, 1:00pm @ IMDA Workshop Tent)
      Charlie will explore songs that express varying ideas of ‘parting’ or separation in the Irish tradition due to death, end of love, end of an era, end of the night, nostalgia, etc.
      Scottish Songs Workshop (Sunday Aug 12, 4:00pm @ IMDA Workshop Tent)
      To show that Scottish singing is very much alive and in good hands today, Charlie will sing some of his favorite recently-written songs from this vibrant Gaelic and Celtic tradition.

    • The Eddies-Songs of Diaspora

      The Eddies

      Chuck Lentz and Mark Richardson, of The Eddies, will present “Songs of the Irish Diaspora”. The songs they will sing will speak of  the separation felt by Irish people abroad and those staying in Ireland. There will be songs about Irish immigrants in Australia, England, America and Newfoundland and other songs that are sung in Irish communities throughout the world. Learn more about The Eddies.

    • Martin Tourish-Learning the Irish Accordion

      Máirtín Tourish, of Altan, is an accordionist, composer, producer and musicologist from Co. Donegal and now based in Dublin. His ancestors were collectors of dance music whose manuscripts date from 1896. Martin’s debut album Clan Ranald with bouzouki player Luke Ward was released in 2005 and listed by music critic Earle Hitchner of the Irish Echo and Wall Street Journal, as being in the top 20 albums of 2005. From the success of the Clan Ranald album, Martin is listed in The Rough Guide to Ireland as a piano accordionist of note while a track from the album appears in The Rough Guide to Irish Folk Vol. 2. In 2008, he became the first piano accordionist to win TG4′s prestigious ‘Young Musician of the Year’ award which a subsequent article in The Irish Times regarded as “the Irish Music equivalent of an Oscar”. altan.ie/martin-tourish/

    • Charlie Heymann-Songs of Scotland

      Charlie Heymann picked up his love of singing and Irish music from his mother and family friends such as the Armstrong family in Chicago. For 50+ years now Charlie has collected songs the world over, and many of his favorites are little known even to those with deep interests in the Irish, Scottish and American ballad traditions.

      YouTube link to Charlie’s singing

      Parting Songs Workshop (Sunday Aug 12, 1:00pm @ IMDA Workshop Tent)
      Charlie will explore songs that express varying ideas of ‘parting’ or separation in the Irish tradition due to death, end of love, end of an era, end of the night, nostalgia, etc.
      Scottish Songs Workshop (Sunday Aug 12, 4:00pm @ IMDA Workshop Tent)
      To show that Scottish singing is very much alive and in good hands today, Charlie will sing some of his favorite recently-written songs from this vibrant Gaelic and Celtic tradition.